15 Aug

Perseid Meteor Shower

Posted by Will Schueneman on

All you astronomers out there, did you get a chance to get your telescopes out and see the famous Perseids Meteor Shower that happened last weekend?  I missed it this time but you can be sure I won’t miss the next one.  It was recorded that the meteor shower peaked on the mornings of August 11-13.  In past years it has been known for this meteor shower to produce anywhere from 50 to 100 meteors per hour, and that the amount of meteors increase as it gets later into the night and early morning.  I recently found out, and will be interesting to those who are constellation enthusiasts, that the Perseid Meteor Shower radiates from a star in the constellation Perseus the Hero, hence the name “Perseids Meteor Shower”.

I recently started an interest in astronomy within the past year.  So I am, what some consider, to be an amateur.  The whole unknown part is what really drew me to it.  To think that we have only explored a small fraction of the universe,

Perseids Meteor Shower

Meteor from the Perseid Meteor Shower

with the endless possibilities that could be out there.  When I was little, telescopes used to be very expensive so it wasn’t until recently my interest in astronomy started.  Telescopes are actually quite affordable now.  Even some of the best brands like Celestron and Meade have telescopes under $100.

So, if you missed the Perseid Meteor Shower last weekend don’t worry, they happen at the same time every year around August 12th.  If you’re like me and you don’t want to wait that long, just keep your eyes up in the sky in the beginning of October.  The Draconid Meteor Shower is scheduled to peak around the nights of October 7-8.  This meteor shower is not as big as the Perseids but some years have recorded up to 100 meteors in a single hour.

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Outdoors fanatic and everything that has to do with it. Camping, hiking, fishing, you name it. Amateur sports shooter with experience explaining and working with binoculars, rifle scopes, night vision, rangefinders and more.

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